Five Essential Things To Know About Ammonia Refrigeration

During the 1970s, chlorofluorocarbon or CFC has been a frequently used refrigerant gas. Refrigerant gases are used in air conditioners, freezers, and refrigerators. Condensed under pressure, refrigerants have the capacity to chill the air. CFC was gradually taken away as a refrigerant because scientists found out that when the gas seeped out into the atmosphere, a chemical substance change triggered by way of the sun's ultraviolet rays damaged the ozone layer. This has led to the development and sourcing of natural chemicals that produce a small impact on the atmosphere. One of those natural refrigerants is ammonia or NH3.

Ammonia refrigeration is well-known in business applications. You'll see them being used by breweries, distribution cold stores, fish trawlers, food processing plants like slaughterhouses and frozen treats factories, freezing tunnels, post-harvest cooling of vegatables and fruits, and so on. Basically, every food item and perishable good goes thru this refrigeration system before getting to the consumers.

Ammonia is an ideal refrigerant for industries who want to limit their effect on the environment as it has 0 % Global Warming Potential or GWP and zero Ozone Depleting Potential or ODP. In addition to being beneficial to our environment, many industries have found ammonia systems to be remarkably effective. This is why the market share of ammonia systems for industrial uses is booming.

Ammonia is called a natural refrigerant since it is a natural substance on the environment. It is present in water, soil, and air, and contains one atom of nitrogen and three atoms of hydrogen, therefore, the chemical symbol NH3. Ammonia is probably the most generously available refrigerants, which makes it very affordable. Nevertheless, certain setups will make it costly when special equipment like steel tubing and safety devices like gas detectors are required.

Ammonia is well-suited for all those common materials but not with steel and copper. This may show that a processing factory or possibly a manufacturing facility will likely be limited to using only welded steel and installing compressors with distinct motor coatings.

The other limitation to ammonia system of refrigeration is safety a result of the flammability and toxicity of the natural refrigerant. Adhering to rigid rules and making sure training for on-site personnel that deal with and work around the natural refrigerant have to be implemented to keep away from any unpleasant situations. A feasible solution that some industries use is putting carbon dioxide for cascade applications with low temperatures and as a volatile brine for medium to high temperatures.

Ammonia refrigeration is an excellent strategy to decreasing the environmental influence of several businesses today. Even the International Space Station apparently uses it with their air conditioning unit! Whether it's for manufacturing or cold storage (or space), using ammonia system allows businesses to be environment friendly without sacrificing on effectiveness.

Industrial Refrigerators is widely used in industrial applications. You'll find them being utilized by breweries, distribution cold stores, fish trawlers, food processing plants like slaughterhouses and frozen treats factories, freezing tunnels, post-harvest cooling of fruits and veggies, and so on.



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